Copyright © Floor Vista  |  All Rights Reserved

Stay Connected
Contact Us

   Tell: 1-818-298-7506       Fax: 1-818-768-1804    flooring@floorvista.com     www.floorvista.com


HARDWOOD

Solid , Engineered & Bamboo

Hardwood Flooring is almost exclusively manufactured from wood harvested from deciduous tree species, trees that shed their leaves in winter. Woods used in flooring are chosen for how well they wear over time, measured in terms of hardness and dimensional stability, and for color and grain ranging from the palest shade of white oak to the crimson tones of padauk or the rich burgundy black of mahogany.

The huge variety of styles, colors, and species in both solid and engineered woods makes hardwood flooring an option for any décor. 

Types of Hardwood

1. Solid

The standard thickness for solid hardwood is ¾”. For thin profile solid hardwood, 5/16 is the standard. The planks are sawn in one of three ways, which affects the stability, and the price of the hardwood.

2. Engineered

Engineered hardwood is made by gluing a real hardwood veneer to a core board made of either plywood or high density fiberboard. Because of this construction method, engineered hardwood is more dimensionally stable than solid hardwood. In other words it will not contract or expand as much due to changes in humidity or temperature.

3. Bamboo

In a world increasingly concerned about the

sustainability of the things we use, bamboo flooring is like a breath of fresh
air. Environmentally sound, yet resilient and durable, bamboo flooring is the
hardwood flooring solution for those who are looking for a beautiful floor
without having to sacrifice quality, cost, or the environment. 

Bamboo flooring is available in just as many colors, grains
and styles as traditional hardwood floors, if not more. Bamboo flooring can
give your décor any of the looks you are going for, from the classic down-home
feel to the contemporary, chic look that so many are looking for today.



TILE

A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, metal, or even glass. Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, walls, showers, or other objects such as tabletops. Alternatively, tile can sometimes refer to similar units made from lightweight materials such as perlite, wood, and mineral wool, typically used for wall and ceiling applications. Less precisely, the modern term can refer to any sort of construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of baked clay.

Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made from ceramic, with a hard glaze finish, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, marble, granite, slate, and reformed ceramic slurry, which is cast in a mould and fired.

Floor Tiles 

These are commonly made of ceramic or stone, although recent technological advances have resulted in rubber or glass tiles for floors as well. Ceramic tiles may be painted and glazed. Small mosaic tiles may be laid in various patterns. Floor tiles are typically set into mortar consisting of sand, cement and often a latex additive for extra adhesion. The spaces between the tiles are nowadays filled with sanded or unsanded floor grout, but traditionally mortar was used.


Natural Stone Tilescan be beautiful but as a natural product they are less uniform in color and pattern, and require more planning for use and installation. Mass produced stone tiles are uniform in width and length. Granite or marble tiles are sawn on both sides and then polished or finished on the facing up side, so that they have a uniform thickness. Other natural stone tiles such as slate are typically "riven" (split) on the facing up side so that the thickness of the tile varies slightly from one spot on the tile to another and from one tile to another. Variations in tile thickness can be handled by adjusting the amount of mortar under each part of the tile, by using wide grout lines that "ramp" between different thicknesses, or by using a cold chisel to knock off high spots.

Some stone tiles such as polished granite, marble, and travertine are very slippery when wet. Stone tiles with a riven (split) surface such as slate or with a sawn and then sandblasted or honed surface will be more slip resistant. Ceramic tiles for use in wet areas can be made more slip resistant either by using very small tiles so that the grout lines acts as grooves or by imprinting a contour pattern onto the face of the tile.

The hardness of natural stone tiles varies such that some of the softer stone (e.g. limestone) tiles are not suitable for very heavy traffic floor areas. On the other hand, ceramic tiles typically have a glazed upper surface and when that becomes scratched or pitted the floor looks worn, whereas the same amount of wear on natural stone tiles won't show, or will be less noticeable.

Natural stone tiles can be stained by spilled liquids; they must be sealed and periodically resealed with a sealant in contrast to ceramic tiles which only need their grout lines sealed. However, because of the complex, non repeating patterns in natural stone, small amounts of dirt on many natural stone floor tiles do not

show.


Porcelain is a ceramic material made by heating raw materials, generally including clay in the form of kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 °C (2,192 °F) and 1,400 °C (2,552 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain arise mainly from the formation of glass and the mineral mullite within the fired body at these high temperatures.

Porcelain derives its present name from old Italian porcellana (cowrie shell) because of its resemblance to the translucent surface of the shell.[1] Porcelain can informally be referred to as "china" in some English-speaking countries, as China was the birth place of porcelain making.[2] Properties associated with porcelain include low permeability and elasticity; considerable strength, hardness, glassiness, brittleness, whiteness, translucence, and resonance; and a high resistance to chemical attack and thermal shock.

For the purposes of trade, the Combined Nomenclature of the European Communities defines porcelain as being "completely vitrified, hard, impermeable (even before glazing), white or artificially coloured, translucent (except when of considerable thickness) and resonant." However, the term porcelain lacks a universal definition and has "been applied in a very unsystematic fashion to substances of diverse kinds which have only certain surface-qualities in common" (Burton 1906).

Porcelain is used to make table, kitchen, sanitary, and decorative wares; objects of fine art; and tiles. Its high resistance to the passage of electricity makes porcelain an excellent insulator.


LAMINATE

You want the look of hardwood but don’t have the budget. Get ready for a great solution. Laminate flooring is durable, scratch, stain and fade resistant, easy to clean, hypoallergenic and perfect for households with pets and children and costs less than solid hardwood, every time. There are all kinds of laminates, not only with different looks but different plank widths and colors that are built to withstand different degrees of traffic.

Advantages of Laminate

Laminate looks good and is made to mimic the look of wood or stone or tile. Yes, it’s durable because it resists scratches and stains. And laminates can be priced perfectly to suit your needs. There are many reasons why a laminate floor might be perfect for you.

·         Laminate Flooring is Durable

·         Easy To Install

·         An Economical Choice. (Laminate flooring is relatively less expensive than most flooring options available in the market)

·         Wide Variety of Styles

·         Easy to Clean and Maintain

 Where Can Laminate Floors Be Installed / Not Installed?

Laminate wood floors are extremely versatile flooring products. A laminate floor installation can be done in almost every room of your home, above or below ground, over wood or concrete. Most of the floor manufacturers market their laminate floors as an ‘install anywhere’ product. 


VINYL FLOORING

Vinyl flooring is a synthetic product made of chlorinated petrochemicals. 

All vinyl floors are resilient but not all resilient floors are vinyl. However, the most common type of resilient flooring is vinyl. There are two types of vinyl flooring: sheet vinyl and vinyl composition tiles (VCT).

(According to the RFCI – Resilient Floor Covering Institute) 

Resilient flooring refers to flooring materials which have a relatively firm surface, yet characteristically have “give” and “bounce back” to their original surface profile from the weight of objects that compress its surface. It has long been the most popular hard surface flooring in the United States.

Resilient flooring materials are made in various shapes and sizes including both tile and roll form.